Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food (2022)

Temperature effect on growth rates of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus, was studied. Growth rates were obtained in laboratory medium by using a binary dilutions method in which 15 optical density curves were generated to determine one ¿ value. The temperature was in the range from 2 to 48 °C, depending on the bacterial species. Data were analysed after a square root transformation. No large difference between the strains of a same species was observed, and therefore all the strains of a same species were analysed together with the same secondary model. The variability of the residual error, including both measurements errors and biological strain difference, was homogenous for sub-optimal temperature values. To represent this variability in bacterial kinetic simulation, the 95% confidence interval based on an asymptotic Normal distribution, around the growth rate value was determined. With this modelling approach, the behaviour of bacterial species on food, irrespective of the strain or the laboratory, was described. This growth simulation with confidence limits has several applications, such as to facilitate comparisons between a challenge-test and simulation results, and, to appreciate if the temperature change has or has not a significant effect on a bacterial growth profile, with regard to the uncontrolled factors. The integration of this piece of work in the Sym'Previus software is now in process. Results obtained in five French laboratories will be extended by working on new food and new microbial species and improved by further work on variability estimation

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-186
JournalInternational Journal of Food Microbiology
Volume100
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
  • escherichia-coli o157-h7
  • listeria-monocytogenes
  • risk-assessment
  • acid concentration
  • model
  • ph
  • uncertainty
  • parameters
  • products
  • tool
  • APA
  • Author
  • BIBTEX
  • Harvard
  • Standard
  • RIS
  • Vancouver

Membré, J. M., Leporq, B., Vialette, M., Mettler, E., Perrier, L., Thuault, D. (2005). Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 100(1-3), 179-186. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.10.015

(Video) Lab 2-9: Effect of Temperature on Microbial Growth

Membré, J.M. ; Leporq, B. ; Vialette, M. ; Mettler, E. ; Perrier, L. ; Thuault, D. ; Zwietering, M.H. / Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food. In: International Journal of Food Microbiology. 2005 ; Vol. 100, No. 1-3. pp. 179-186.

@article{1979f4adc46d4596bd9d0fa7186d4bd4,

title = "Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food",

abstract = "Temperature effect on growth rates of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus, was studied. Growth rates were obtained in laboratory medium by using a binary dilutions method in which 15 optical density curves were generated to determine one ¿ value. The temperature was in the range from 2 to 48 °C, depending on the bacterial species. Data were analysed after a square root transformation. No large difference between the strains of a same species was observed, and therefore all the strains of a same species were analysed together with the same secondary model. The variability of the residual error, including both measurements errors and biological strain difference, was homogenous for sub-optimal temperature values. To represent this variability in bacterial kinetic simulation, the 95% confidence interval based on an asymptotic Normal distribution, around the growth rate value was determined. With this modelling approach, the behaviour of bacterial species on food, irrespective of the strain or the laboratory, was described. This growth simulation with confidence limits has several applications, such as to facilitate comparisons between a challenge-test and simulation results, and, to appreciate if the temperature change has or has not a significant effect on a bacterial growth profile, with regard to the uncontrolled factors. The integration of this piece of work in the Sym'Previus software is now in process. Results obtained in five French laboratories will be extended by working on new food and new microbial species and improved by further work on variability estimation",

keywords = "escherichia-coli o157-h7, listeria-monocytogenes, risk-assessment, acid concentration, model, ph, uncertainty, parameters, products, tool",

author = "J.M. Membr{\'e} and B. Leporq and M. Vialette and E. Mettler and L. Perrier and D. Thuault and M.H. Zwietering",

year = "2005",

doi = "10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.10.015",

language = "English",

volume = "100",

pages = "179--186",

journal = "International Journal of Food Microbiology",

issn = "0168-1605",

(Video) Quantitative Methods for Microbial Food Safety – Application of Predictive Microbiolog

publisher = "Elsevier",

number = "1-3",

}

Membré, JM, Leporq, B, Vialette, M, Mettler, E, Perrier, L, Thuault, D 2005, 'Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food', International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 100, no. 1-3, pp. 179-186. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.10.015

Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food. / Membré, J.M.; Leporq, B.; Vialette, M.; Mettler, E.; Perrier, L.; Thuault, D.; Zwietering, M.H.

In: International Journal of Food Microbiology, Vol. 100, No. 1-3, 2005, p. 179-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food

AU - Membré, J.M.

AU - Leporq, B.

(Video) food For Tomorrow 2015 - Impacts of a Changing Climate

AU - Vialette, M.

AU - Mettler, E.

AU - Perrier, L.

AU - Thuault, D.

AU - Zwietering, M.H.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Temperature effect on growth rates of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus, was studied. Growth rates were obtained in laboratory medium by using a binary dilutions method in which 15 optical density curves were generated to determine one ¿ value. The temperature was in the range from 2 to 48 °C, depending on the bacterial species. Data were analysed after a square root transformation. No large difference between the strains of a same species was observed, and therefore all the strains of a same species were analysed together with the same secondary model. The variability of the residual error, including both measurements errors and biological strain difference, was homogenous for sub-optimal temperature values. To represent this variability in bacterial kinetic simulation, the 95% confidence interval based on an asymptotic Normal distribution, around the growth rate value was determined. With this modelling approach, the behaviour of bacterial species on food, irrespective of the strain or the laboratory, was described. This growth simulation with confidence limits has several applications, such as to facilitate comparisons between a challenge-test and simulation results, and, to appreciate if the temperature change has or has not a significant effect on a bacterial growth profile, with regard to the uncontrolled factors. The integration of this piece of work in the Sym'Previus software is now in process. Results obtained in five French laboratories will be extended by working on new food and new microbial species and improved by further work on variability estimation

AB - Temperature effect on growth rates of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens and Bacillus cereus, was studied. Growth rates were obtained in laboratory medium by using a binary dilutions method in which 15 optical density curves were generated to determine one ¿ value. The temperature was in the range from 2 to 48 °C, depending on the bacterial species. Data were analysed after a square root transformation. No large difference between the strains of a same species was observed, and therefore all the strains of a same species were analysed together with the same secondary model. The variability of the residual error, including both measurements errors and biological strain difference, was homogenous for sub-optimal temperature values. To represent this variability in bacterial kinetic simulation, the 95% confidence interval based on an asymptotic Normal distribution, around the growth rate value was determined. With this modelling approach, the behaviour of bacterial species on food, irrespective of the strain or the laboratory, was described. This growth simulation with confidence limits has several applications, such as to facilitate comparisons between a challenge-test and simulation results, and, to appreciate if the temperature change has or has not a significant effect on a bacterial growth profile, with regard to the uncontrolled factors. The integration of this piece of work in the Sym'Previus software is now in process. Results obtained in five French laboratories will be extended by working on new food and new microbial species and improved by further work on variability estimation

KW - escherichia-coli o157-h7

KW - listeria-monocytogenes

KW - risk-assessment

KW - acid concentration

KW - model

KW - ph

KW - uncertainty

KW - parameters

(Video) ILSI India Risk Based Approaches For Food Safety Management - Dr. Kiran Bhilegaonkar

KW - products

KW - tool

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.10.015

DO - 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.10.015

M3 - Article

VL - 100

SP - 179

EP - 186

JO - International Journal of Food Microbiology

JF - International Journal of Food Microbiology

SN - 0168-1605

IS - 1-3

ER -

Membré JM, Leporq B, Vialette M, Mettler E, Perrier L, Thuault D et al. Temperature effect on bacterial growth rate: quantitative microbiology approach including cardinal values and variability estimates to perform growth simulation on/in food. International Journal of Food Microbiology. 2005;100(1-3):179-186. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2004.10.015

FAQs

What is the effect of temperature on the bacterial growth rates? ›

In general, the higher the temperature, the more easily microorganisms can grow up to a certain point. Very high and low temperatures both obstruct the enzyme processes microorganisms depend on to survive.

How does temperature affect the growth rate of a microorganism? ›

As the temperature increases, molecules move faster, enzymes speed up metabolism and cells rapidly increase in size. But, above a certain value all of these activities are proceeding at such high rates, enzymes start to denature, and the total effect is detrimental. Cellular growth ceases.

How does temperature affect bacterial growth hypothesis? ›

Temperatures higher than the maximum growth temperature cause irreversible denaturation of enzymes and therefore cell death. At temperatures below the minimum, molecular motion and enzymatic activities effectively cease.

What are cardinal temperatures for microbial growth? ›

mesophiles: include most bacteria, optimum growth temperature is 20 - 45°C. Many pathogens are mesophiles as their preferred temperature is body temperature (37ºC). thermophiles: heat-loving organisms, optimum growth temperature is 55-65°C. Thermophiles can be found in hot springs, compost heaps, and hot water heaters.

What temperatures has the most effect on controlling bacterial growth? ›

Some bacteria thrive in extreme heat or cold, while others can survive under highly acidic or extremely salty conditions. Most bacteria that cause disease grow fastest in the temperature range between 41 and 135 degrees F, which is known as THE DANGER ZONE.

What factors affect the rate of bacterial growth? ›

The following are some of the most important factors that influence the growth of bacterial populations are:
  • Nutrition concentration.
  • Temperature.
  • Gaseous concentration.
  • pH.
  • Ions and salt concentration.
  • Available water.

What is the effect of temperature and pH on bacterial growth? ›

Microorganisms grow best at their optimum growth pH. Growth occurs slowly or not at all below the minimum growth pH and above the maximum growth pH. Microorganisms thrive at a wide range of temperatures; they have colonized different natural environments and have adapted to extreme temperatures.

How does temperature influence growth? ›

Temperature influences most plant processes, including photosynthesis, transpiration, respiration, germination and flowering. As temperature increases (up to a point), photosynthesis, transpiration and respiration increase.

What are the 3 conditions needed for bacterial growth? ›

Conditions needed for bacterial growth
  • Moisture – Bacteria need moisture in order to grow. ...
  • Food – Food provides energy and nutrients for bacteria to grow. ...
  • Time – If provided with the optimum conditions for growth, bacteria can multiply to millions over a small period of time via binary fission .

What is the relationship between temperature and growth development? ›

Growth and development increases rapidly when temperatures fall between the lower and upper temperature thresholds (B).

Does growth rate increase with temperature? ›

In general, growth rates increase proportionally with temperature up to an optimum and then decrease beyond the physiological limits for the species (Lee and Fenchel, 1972; Martinez, 1980; Baldock and Berger, 1984; Caron et al., 1986; Muller and Geller, 1993; Weisse et al., 2001).

What temperature does bacteria grow best and why? ›

Food poisoning bacteria grow best at temperatures between 5°C and 60°C. This is called the Temperature Danger Zone. Keeping potentially hazardous foods cold (below 5°C) or hot (above 60°C) stops the bacteria from growing.

What are the 3 classifications of temperature for microbial growth? ›

Organisms can be classified according to their optimum growth temperature.:
  • PSYCHROPHILES grow best between -5oC and 20oC,
  • MESOPHILES grow best between 20oC and 45oC and.
  • THERMOPHILES grow best at temperatures above 45oC.
  • THERMODURIC organisms can survive high temperatures but don't grow well at such temperatures.

Why is the cardinal temperature important? ›

Cardinal temperatures help us determine germination timing and favorable conditions for the early growth and development of seedlings. Although rainfall and moisture form one of the inhibiting environmental factors in the desert, the temperature is the most important factor for germination and planting dates.

What is the meaning of cardinal temperature? ›

Minimum and maximum temperatures that define limits of growth and development of an organism, and an optimum temperature at which growth proceeds with greatest rapidity. Cardinal temperatures may vary with the stage of development.

Why is temperature control our most effective weapon against bacterial growth? ›

By controlling the temperature, you can control the levels of bacteria which spoil foods and cause illness. Heat kills bacteria, while cold temperatures slow down the growth of bacteria to prevent it from reaching harmful levels.

At what temperature does bacterial growth decrease? ›

Human microbial pathogens usually thrive at body temperature, 37ºC. Low temperatures usually inhibit or stop microbial growth and proliferation but often do not kill bacteria. Refrigeration (4ºC) and freezing (-20ºC or less) are commonly used in the food, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology industry.

How can you control the growth of bacteria due to time temperature abuse? ›

Cook food until it reaches +165ºF for 15 seconds (this temperature kills bacteria) If holding food, keep hot foods at +135ºF and cold food under +41ºF. Use two-stage cooling to chill leftover foods by taking them from +135ºF to +70ºF within two hours and then from +70ºF to +41ºF in four hours or less.

What are the 4 main requirements for bacterial growth? ›

There are four things that can impact the growth of bacteria. These are: temperatures, moisture, oxygen, and a particular pH. Many bacteria prefer warm environments, but there are some that thrive in low or high temperatures.

What are the 4 conditions of bacterial growth? ›

These conditions include temperature, moisture, pH and environmental oxygen. Understanding the optimal conditions for bacterial growth can potentially help you reduce your risk for bacterial infections and food poisoning.

What are the six conditions that affect bacterial growth? ›

FATTOM is an acronym used to describe the conditions necessary for bacterial growth: Food, acidity, time, temperature, oxygen, and moisture.

What temperature range does bacteria grow? ›

Bacteria grow most rapidly in the range of temperatures between 40 °F and 140 °F, doubling in number in as little as 20 minutes. This range of temperatures is often called the "Danger Zone."

What is the effect of temperature on pH value? ›

*pH decreases with increase in temperature. But this does not mean that water becomes more acidic at higher temperatures. A solution is considered as acidic if there is an excess of hydrogen ions over hydroxide ions.

What happens to cell when temperature increases? ›

Both higher and lower temperatures affect various aspects of the cell membrane including its structure and permeability. They also affect how well molecules found within the membrane can function. Higher temperatures increase fluidity and permeability. Lower temperatures lower fluidity and permeability.

How does temperature pose a major impact on crop growth and development? ›

High temperature, even for short period, affects crop growth especially in temperate crops like wheat. High air temperature reduces the growth of shoots and in turn reduces root growth. High soil temperature is more crucial as damage to the roots is severe resulting in substantial reduction in shoot growth.

Does increasing temp increase products? ›

For an exothermic reaction, heat is essentially a product of the reaction. In keeping with Le Chatelier's principle, if you increase the temperature you are increasing the amount of products, and so you shift the balance at equilibrium back toward reactants, meaning there will be more reactants left at equilibrium.

What is the relationship between temperature and degree? ›

The temperature in the Fahrenheit scale will be expressed in degrees Fahrenheit. The relation between Celsius and Fahrenheit is proportional.
...
Fahrenheit to Celsius.
1 degrees Celsius to FahrenheitF = ( 9 5 × 1 ) + 3233.8 °F
1 Fahrenheit to CelsiusC = 5 9 ( 1 − 32 )-17.2222 °C

What is the relationship between temperature and high? ›

Near the Earth's surface, air gets cooler the higher you climb. As you climb a mountain, you can expect the air temperature to decrease by 6.5 degrees C for every 1000 meters you gain. This is called the standard (average) lapse rate.

What is the relationship between temperature and the height of? ›

Temperature varies with altitude, as follows: In the troposphere, temperature decreases as altitude increases. In the stratosphere, temperature generally increases as altitude increases due to the increasing absorption of ultraviolet radiation by the ozone layer.

What factors increase growth rate? ›

There are three main factors that drive economic growth: Accumulation of capital stock. Increases in labor inputs, such as workers or hours worked. Technological advancement.

Why does increasing temperature increase rate? ›

With increase in the temperature, the number of molecules with energy equal to or greater than activation energy increases. This increases the number of effective collisions and the rate of the reaction.

What causes growth rate to increase? ›

Technological advances and new product developments can exert positive influences on economic growth. Increases in demand from foreign markets can lead to higher export sales. In any and all of these cases, the influx of income, if big enough, causes an increase in the economic growth rate.

What are the 4 major thermal classifications of bacteria? ›

Hyperthermophile (60 degrees C and upwards) Thermophile (optimal growth between 45 and 122 degrees) Mesophile (20 and 45 degrees C) Psychrotrophs (will survive at 0 degrees C, but prefer mesophilic temperature.

What are the different types of bacteria that grow at different temperatures? ›

There are three kinds of groups of bacteria according to the temperature ranges, psychrophiles microbes that grow at cold temperatures, mesophiles microbes that grow at moderate temperatures and the thermophiles that grow at high temperatures.

What is the purpose of temperature measurement? ›

The measurement of body temperature can help detect illness. It can also monitor whether or not treatment is working. A high temperature is a fever.

What are the cardinal temperature ranges? ›

three temperature points are the cardinal temperatures for a given plant; the cardinal temperatures are known for most plant species, at least approximately. Cool-season crops (oats, rye, wheat, and barley) have low cardinal temperatures: minimum 32° to 41° F (0° to 5° C), optimum 77° to 88° F (25° το

How do you calculate Cardinal temperature? ›

Cardinal temperatures consist of minimum, optimum and maximum of plant growth, and might be able to be determined by assessing effect of temperature on seed germination. An experiment of seed germination was conducted in laboratory, using thermal gradient plate for ten days.

What do you mean by Cardinal temperature for crop growth and reproduction? ›

... plant has its own maximum, optimum and minimum temperature limits for its normal growth and reproduction. These three levels are known as cardinal temperature ( Table 1). ...

What does Cardinal mean in biology? ›

Cardinal. Chief or principal;in embryology, relating to the main venous drainage. Origin: L. Cardinalis, principal.

What damaging effects do changes in temperature have on bacterial cells? ›

In general, an increase in temperature will increase enzyme activity. But if temperatures get too high, enzyme activity will reduce, and the protein (the enzyme) will denature.

How does temperature affect bacterial growth quizlet? ›

How does temperature affect the growth of microorganisms? it is directly dependent- increasing temperatures enzyme activity increases until the 3D configuration is lost bc of denaturation of their protein structure. decreasing temperatures enzyme inactivation occurs and cellular metabolism gradually diminishes.

How does temperature influence growth? ›

Temperature influences most plant processes, including photosynthesis, transpiration, respiration, germination and flowering. As temperature increases (up to a point), photosynthesis, transpiration and respiration increase.

What happens to bacteria in high temperatures? ›

The World Health Organization (WHO) notes that bacteria are rapidly killed at temperatures above 149°F (65°C).

What is the effect of temperature and pH on bacterial growth? ›

Microorganisms grow best at their optimum growth pH. Growth occurs slowly or not at all below the minimum growth pH and above the maximum growth pH. Microorganisms thrive at a wide range of temperatures; they have colonized different natural environments and have adapted to extreme temperatures.

What is the relationship between temperature and growth development? ›

Growth and development increases rapidly when temperatures fall between the lower and upper temperature thresholds (B).

What are the 3 classifications of temperature for microbial growth? ›

Microorganisms are classified into three primary groups on the basis of their preferred range of temperature: psychrophiles (cold-loving microbes), mesophiles (moderate-temperature loving microbes) and thermophiles (heat-loving microbes).

Does growth rate increase with temperature? ›

In general, growth rates increase proportionally with temperature up to an optimum and then decrease beyond the physiological limits for the species (Lee and Fenchel, 1972; Martinez, 1980; Baldock and Berger, 1984; Caron et al., 1986; Muller and Geller, 1993; Weisse et al., 2001).

How does temperature pose a major impact on crop growth and development? ›

High temperature, even for short period, affects crop growth especially in temperate crops like wheat. High air temperature reduces the growth of shoots and in turn reduces root growth. High soil temperature is more crucial as damage to the roots is severe resulting in substantial reduction in shoot growth.

Does increasing temp increase products? ›

For an exothermic reaction, heat is essentially a product of the reaction. In keeping with Le Chatelier's principle, if you increase the temperature you are increasing the amount of products, and so you shift the balance at equilibrium back toward reactants, meaning there will be more reactants left at equilibrium.

How can high and low temperature affect the growth of microorganisms? ›

Temperature is an important factor for microbial growth. Each species has its own optimal growth temperature at which it flourishes. Human microbial pathogens usually thrive at body temperature, 37ºC. Low temperatures usually inhibit or stop microbial growth and proliferation but often do not kill bacteria.

Which bacteria is most resistant to high temperatures? ›

In the 1960s, heat resistant bacteria were discovered in hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. This bacteria, thermus aquaticus thrives at temperatures of 70°C (160°F) but can survive temperatures of 50°C to 80°C (120°F to 175°F).

Which bacteria can survive high temperature? ›

A thermophile is an organism—a type of extremophile—that thrives at relatively high temperatures, between 41 and 122 °C (106 and 252 °F). Many thermophiles are archaea, though they can be bacteria or fungi. Thermophilic eubacteria are suggested to have been among the earliest bacteria.

What temperature range does bacteria grow? ›

Bacteria grow most rapidly in the range of temperatures between 40 °F and 140 °F, doubling in number in as little as 20 minutes. This range of temperatures is often called the "Danger Zone."

What is the effect of temperature on pH value? ›

*pH decreases with increase in temperature. But this does not mean that water becomes more acidic at higher temperatures. A solution is considered as acidic if there is an excess of hydrogen ions over hydroxide ions.

Which temperature range inhibits the growth of bacteria? ›

Bacteria are all around us, including those that can cause food poisoning. Food poisoning bacteria grow best at temperatures between 5°C and 60°C. This is called the Temperature Danger Zone. Keeping potentially hazardous foods cold (below 5°C) or hot (above 60°C) stops the bacteria from growing.

Videos

1. SLAF Seminar Series: Dr Ross Corkrey and Dr Tom Ross: From Biological Growth Rates to Thermodynamics
(Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture)
2. Session 3 : Quantitative risk assessment modelisation and source attribution in the genomic era
(Anses - Agence nationale de sécurité sanitaire)
3. They Are What You Eat - How Food and Drugs Interact with the Gut Microbiome
(University of California Television (UCTV))
4. A webinar series on scientific topics related to the Kuroshio and its adjacent regions, 14 Aug 2020
(IOC-WESTPAC of UNESCO)
5. Contributed Papers VII: Species Interactions: Predators, Parasites, and Microbes
(ASNAmNat)
6. Statistical Tests: Choosing which statistical test to use
(Dr Nic's Maths and Stats)

Top Articles

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Tish Haag

Last Updated: 08/02/2022

Views: 6279

Rating: 4.7 / 5 (47 voted)

Reviews: 94% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Tish Haag

Birthday: 1999-11-18

Address: 30256 Tara Expressway, Kutchburgh, VT 92892-0078

Phone: +4215847628708

Job: Internal Consulting Engineer

Hobby: Roller skating, Roller skating, Kayaking, Flying, Graffiti, Ghost hunting, scrapbook

Introduction: My name is Tish Haag, I am a excited, delightful, curious, beautiful, agreeable, enchanting, fancy person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.